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Disability Scholarship

Over the last 25 years ACCES has awarded scholarships to many students with disabilities, all of whom have gone on to be successful in their careers, with several focusing on studies to help others with disabilities. In the process, ACCES has realized how little infrastructure there is in Kenya for those who have mobility issues as well as those with visual and auditory impairments.

In 2008 the Kenya National Survey for Persons with Disabilities (KNSPWD) was undertaken for the first and only time. The survey found that:

  • Nearly 5% of Kenyans experience some form of disability
  • Visual and physical disabilities are three times as prevalent as all others
  • Most of them reside in rural areas
  • 65% regard the environment as the major problem
  • At least a third are unable to find work
  • Of those able to find work, 45% had either a secondary or college education
  • Less than 1% of people with disabilities were able to attain a university education

The 2012 UNESCO report on Education For All Global Monitoring said:

“Very few young people in Kenya living with disabilities study beyond primary level. They face constraints in employment because of their low level of education, little or no adaptation of their workplaces, and limited expectations among families and employers…”  and that “3.6% of youth aged 15 to 24 had disabilities, only 8% had worked for pay, and …over 50% had not worked. (GMR 2012)

Clearly, students with disabilities in Kenya face many obstacles, and for some, they’re insurmountable without some kind of assistance along the way.

For this reason, ACCES has created a special category that will not only get disabled students into school, but will help them with items such as hearing aids, braille text books, mobility devices and other necessary materials to ensure they can succeed.

These scholarships are a bit more expensive than the regular ones as a result, but ACCES is pleased to report that an anonymous donor is matching up to ten of these scholarships, which means that your support of one disabled student, will turn into two!